Archive for the ‘Company C’ Category

70 and 150 Years Ago: Two Promotions

January 26, 2015

70 years ago on January 1, 1945, Felix A. Cizewski, was promoted to Private First Class.

He was serving in Company C, 3110th Signal Service Battalion, Army Service Forces in Paris. He was in a hospital recovering from frostbite.

He is my late father.


munichapriljuly45 1jan45promotion

LEFT: Private Felix A. Cizewski on

occupation duty in Munich between

April and July, 1945.

From the collection of Felix A. Cizewski

© Leonard H. Cizewski

RIGHT: Unit Morning Report recording

his promotion.

Public domain image

150 years ago on January 26, 1865, Anson Croman was promoted to corporal.

He served in Company F, 20th Michigan Infantry Regiment, Second Brigade, First Division,  IX Corps, Army of the Potomac. At that time the 20th Michigan was part of the Union siege of Petersburg  near Battery Nine just south of the the Appomattox River on the northeast edge of the city.

Anson Croman is Cheryl A. Robinson’s 2nd great-grandfather and my 2nd great-grandfather-in-law.


croman Promotion rotated 90 degress

LEFT: Corporal Anson Croman

© The descendants of Anson Croman

RIGHT: Official certificate of promotion.

Public domain image

Links, sources, and more information:

Felix A. Cizewski and WWII

Anson Croman and the Civil War


Shortlink: http://wp.me/p2ix3W-Gs
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Paris 1944: Felix Hospitalized With Frostbite

December 4, 2014

Seventy years ago on about December 10, 1944, Felix A. Cizewski, my late father, was admitted to a U.S. Army hospital in Paris with severe frostbite to his hands and feet.

In his letters Ray Davidson of Company A, 3110th Signal Service Battalion reports increasing rain and dropping temperatures in Paris.

In Citizen SoldiersStephen Ambrose  reports “It was Northern Europe’s coldest winter in forty years…”


FROSTBITE RISK

These photos are from the about same time and near place as Felix and Company C served

None of these photos are of Felix A. Cizewski or Company C, 3110th Signal Service Battalion.

The following two illustrate the type of work that Felix and Company C, the Open Wire Repair Section of the 3110th Signal Service Battalion, were doing when Felix suffered frostbite.

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Signal lineman repairs wire in the Ardennes.

Public Domain photo from The Signal Corps: The Outcome (Mid-1943 through 1945),  p. 160.

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European Theatre of Operations, December, 1944. Soldier traces a broken field wire for splicing.

Public domain U.S. Army photo from: The story of the U.S. Army Signal Corps between pages 114 & 115.

TRENCH (IMMERSION) FOOT RISK

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During cold weather Signal Corps personnel needed to work in and around water such as swimming wire across the Moselle River.

Public domain photo from:  The Signal Corps: The Outcome (Mid-1943 through 1945),  p. 132.

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British or Canadian Signalmen using amphibious DUKWs and Weasels to work in areas flooded when the Germans blew up nearby dykes.

Early February, 1945, in the Netherlands along the Nijmegen-Cleve road near the German border town of Kranenburg

Imperial War Museum photo from The Rhineland 1945: the final push into Germany (Praeger illustration military history), Ford, Ken, 2004, Osprey Publishing, p. 48.


Felix said that the Army doctors told him that they might need to amputate part of all of his hands and feet.

However, night after night, after the American doctors had gone, a captured German doctor working in the American hospital massaged Felix’s hands and feet with a special salve.

Eventually Felix healed enough to avoid amputations and return to be reassigned to the 45th Signal Company.

A captured American soldier with “frozen feet” reported that from German medical supplies, the German guard gave him “something that looked like axle grease…which we rubbed on our feet.” (From Alex Kershaw in The Longest Winter, Da Capo Press, 2004, page 168.) Could this be the special salve Felix described that the German POW doctor used?


coldinjurybfw

Medic treating GI with trench foot and cold injuries to his hands and face. This illustrates what Felix might have suffered and the treatment with a salve.

Diorama in the Truschbaum Museum, Camp Elsenborn, Belgium. (Photo used by permission.)


FELIX’S POST FROSTBITE RAYNAUD”S SYNDROME SYMPTOMS

Felix’s wife  reports that the skin on his feet were fragile and tender for several years after the war.

For the rest of his life, he suffered from a post frost bite syndrome with symptoms that resemble Raynaud’s Syndrome.

The circulation shut down in his hands and feet whenever the weather turned slightly cold but painless. I remember in the winter his hands up to his wrists were cold, cyanotic with poor skin turgor.

R. Richard Kingsbury in his autobiography, The Eighteen-Year-Old Replacement: Facing Combat in Patton’s Third Army describes suffering cold injuries, possibly trench foot. After the war, the VA paid him two 10% disability for the permanent damage to his legs and feet. (Page xiii.)

Felix was an unrecognized and uncompensated disabled veteran.

At a minimum, that is what I believe Felix also deserved if not more as his hands were also permanently damaged.


Links, sources, and more information:

3110th in Paris

Signal Corps personnel and cold injuries

Trench (Immersion) Foot

Felix A. Cizewski: An Unrecognized and Uncompensated Disabled Veteran?


Shortlink: http://wp.me/p2ix3W-EP

The 3110th in Paris

December 3, 2014

Seventy years ago sometime prior to December 10, 1944, the detached unit of Company C, 3110th Signal Service Battalion left Cherbourg for Paris and rejoined the rest of the battalion.


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1944 or 1945:

The only photo of Felix A. Cizewski in Paris.

He is standing in front of a building below a Salle de Réunion sign (meeting rooms for rent) with security gates over its windows.

Date and unit are unknown.

Felix was in Paris in the late fall of 1944 with the 3110th and in March, 1945 while on leave from the 45th Signal Company.

Photo © the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center and Leonard H. Cizewski


Corporal Ray Davidson of Company A reports that the 3110th worked from a building near the Avenue des Champs-Élysées.

They were first housed in a hotel near the Avenue des Champs-Élysées. Their hotel had electricity only a few minutes per day and no hot water.


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June, 2014:

Seventy years later. Felix’s son Leonard on the Avenue des Champs-Élysées near where Felix served.

Since the exact building that the 3110th used may are not known, I decided that the best I could do was to stand under a sign on the Avenue.

Photo by Cheryl A. Robinson


Later the 3110th moved to a school near a race track. Hotels near the Avenue des Champs-Élysées were needed for combat troops on leave.

Corporal Davidson reported that the public transportation system was not working and bicycles were the main means of transportation.

Goods were scarce.

Sidewalks cafes were open but not night clubs or movies theatres. A couple of theatres were showing news reels.

He reports that after they first arrived they had to wait in long lines for their meals and the meals were initially “skimpy”. Their meals improved when the battalion was assigned a restaurant with French cooks.


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October, 1944:

The the only documented photo of the 3110th in Paris.

Corporal Ray Davidson of Company A in Paris.

Photo © Charles N. Davidson


Links, sources, and more information:

3110th in Paris

The WWII Letters of Ray Davidson were compiled by his nephew Charles N. Davidson. Charles privately published them for his family and families of the 3110th.


Another post in an ongoing series about our trip to France for the the memorial in Tamerville, part of the observance of the 70th anniversary of the Liberation of France.

My late father Felix A. Cizewski served in Company C, 3110th Signal Service Battalion in Tamerville, Cherbourg, Paris providing communications and logistical support for the liberation of Normandy in 1944.


Shortlink: http://wp.me/p2ix3W-EL

1943 Thanksgiving at Camp Crowder

November 25, 2014

71 years ago on November 25, 1943 Felix A. Cizewski, my late father, celebrated Thanksgiving with his unit, Company E, 840th Signal Training Battalion, at Camp Crowder, Missouri.

This was an especially profound observance as they knew they were at the end of their training and about to be assigned to a unit and deployed out of the country, probably to Europe.


thanksgiving1[1]

Cover of Company E, 840th Signal Training Battalion November 25, 1943 Thanksgiving Program.

Included a Thanksgiving message from their commander, the menu, and unit roster.

Larger and complete six page program is at:

Thanksgiving Menu and Roster


In December, 1943 they were transferred to Camp Wood, Fort Monmouth, New Jersey  and assigned to the 3110th Signal Service Battalion.

In February, 1944 they boarded a ship to Great Britain.

Six months later in July, 1944 Company C deployed to Normandy followed by the rest of the battalion in August.


Links with sources and for more information:

Camp Crowder, Missouri

Felix A Cizewski:

At Camp Crowder

Deployment to England


Shortlink: http://wp.me/p2ix3W-Ev

Visit to the 3110th Bivouac Site

August 17, 2014

On May 30, 2014, Cheryl and I visited the bivouac site of 3110th Signal Service Battalion and other Signal Corp units north of Tamerville, France.

Seventy years earlier from July 26 to August 18, 1944, Felix A. Cizewski, my later father, bivouacked there as a member of the battalion’s Company C.

Our guide was Claude Letellier, Claude  searches sites with a metal detector. In this field he found artifacts that confirmed it as a both a bivouac site and staging area for communications work.



Leonard and Cheryl at the former Signal Corps bivouac site.

Photo by Claude Letellier

Claude Letellier (left) and Leonard at the bivouac site, now a cow pasture. Signal Corps units also bivouacked in the field behind the trees in the background.

Photo by Cheryl A. Robinson


Bivouac site on Felix and WWII on Google Map

Aerial photo Tamerville. The bivouac site is to top right.

Photo © Georges Dennebouy taken May 26, 2013.


For more information:

Northern France: Includes details of the 3110th Signal Service Battalion’s service in Normandy.

Infantry, Air Force, Medical, and Signal Corps Units in Tamerville and Valognes


Another post in an ongoing series about our trip to France for the 70th anniversary of D-Day and the Liberation of France and the memorial in Tamerville

My late father Felix A. Cizewski served in Company C, 3110th Signal Service Battalion in Tamerville and Cherbourg during the liberation of Normandy in 1944.


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L’ARMEE FRANÇAISE COMBAT EN FRANCE!

August 6, 2014

Among the items my late father Felix A. Cizewski brought home from his WWII service was this leaflet about the 2nd French Armored Division (2e division blindée/2nd DB).

Link to complete four page leaflet


This leaflet (number 44F.19) was created by one of the U.S. psychological operations (PSYOP) organizations to support the morale of French civilians. The message was: “French troops are coming to liberate you!”.

Copies were delivered by air drops or artillery shells.

My father never said where he got this leaflet and why he kept it.

The original has been donated to Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center.


3110th Signal Service Battalion and the 2nd French Armored Division

When the French 2nd Armored Division landed on Utah Beach on August 1, 1944, Felix was with Company C, 3110th Signal Service Battalion about 15 miles (24 kilometers) northwest in Tamerville.

Company C had landed at the same spot on Utah Beach six days earlier.

The 2nd French Armored Division was among the units for which 3110th Signal Service Battalion provided service and support.


THE FRENCH ARMY FIGHTING IN FRANCE!: Unofficial English translation


For more information:

French:

2e division blindée/2nd DB

English:

2nd French Armored Division

Felix A. Cizewski & WWII


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70th Anniversary of Company C, 3110th Signal Service Battalion Landing on Utah Beach

July 28, 2014

70 years ago on July 25, 1944 Company C, 3110th Signal Service Battalion landed on Utah Beach. Among them was Private Felix A. Cizewski, my late father.

The monument to the landing of the 2nd French Armored Division six days later on August 1, 1944 marks the spot where Company C landed.

June 1, 2014: Leonard H Cizewski at the northern end of Utah Beach at the monument where the 2nd French Armor Division landed on August 1, 1944. My late father in Company C, 3110th Signal Service Battalion, landed near this site six days earlier on July 25.

Photo by Cheryl A. Robinson (Felix’s daughter-in-law and Leonard’s wife)


From Utah Beach Company C proceed to Transit Area B at Focarville then to Tamerville.

A map (below) at Le Musée d’Utah Beach  detailed how Utah Beach was used for troop deployment such as Company C.


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Plan of Activities at Utah Beach, June 6 to November 4, 1944.

Orange circle: Transit Area B in Focarville from where Co. C proceeded to Tamerville.

Fair use of image © Le Musée d’Utah Beach from photo by Leonard H. Cizewski


Why Company C has Normandy Campaign Participation Credit:

Company C landed on Utah Beach on July 26, the first day of the Northern France Campaign and one day after the official end of the Normandy Campaign on July 25.

The U.S. Army defined the geographic area of the Normandy Campaign as including the waters of the English Channel.

Geographic area of the Normandy Campaign.

Public domain map from the U.S. Army Center for Military History

On July 25, Company C boarded ships in Southampton, England, leaving the soil of England, entering the geographic region of the Normandy Campaign, and earning Normandy Campaign Participation Credit.


Why Company C is so large

Company C was activated in December, 1943 with about 50 enlisted men and 4 officers.

When Company C landed on Utah Beach it had had 223 enlisted men and 13 officers.

Those additional troops most likely were detached from other Signal Service units and attached to Company C for the work in Tamerville and Valognes.

I will add to my ongoing research those attached units.


For more information:

Northern France: Includes details of the 3110th Signal Service Battalion’s service in Normandy.

Infantry, Air Force, Medical, and Signal Corps Units in Tamerville and Valognes


Another post in an ongoing series about our trip to France for the 70th anniversary of D-Day and the Liberation of France and the memorial in Tamerville

My late father Felix A. Cizewski served in Company C, 3110th Signal Service Battalion in Tamerville and Cherbourg during the liberation of Normandy in 1944.


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Another Face of a Tamerville Liberator

July 20, 2014

Wilbert Hans Hansen with Technician Fifth Grade insignia.
Undated photo © Chris Hansen

Wilbert Hansen’s son Chris Hansen found the information I have been posting about the 3110th Signal Service Battalion and the Tamerville recognition.

Chris’s late father Wilbert Hans Hansen served as a cable splicer in Company C, 3110th Signal Service Battalion as did Felix A. Cizewski my late father.

Our fathers probably knew each other.

Chris reports that except for the photo above almost everything else regarding his late father’s service has been lost.


The town of Tamerville and my Unofficial Informal Archive of the U.S. Army Signal Corps in Northwest Europe in WWII have greatly increased the visibility of the 3110th Signal Service Battalion. That facilitates making connections as the Hansen and Cizewski families have done. That also brings recognition to the service of support troops such as our fathers


For more information:

Northern France with details of the 3110th Signal Service Battalion’s service in Normandy.

Infantry, Air Force, Medical, and Signal Corps Units in Tamerville and Valognes


Revised October 12, 2014


Shortlink: http://wp.me/p2ix3W-uB

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Permanent Installation of Tamerville “Tribute to Our Liberators” Sign

July 10, 2014

The Tamerville “Tribute to Our Liberators” sign has been permanently installed on the west wall of the cemetery next to the town hall.

Sign with cemetery gate
Close up of sign on cemetery wallTamerville’s “Tribute To Our Liberators”sign on the west wall of the cemetery next to the town hall.

Click for large PDF


Photos by Georges Dennebouy

Sign © Commune de Tamerville

For more information:

Northern France with details of the 3110th Signal Service Battalion’s service in Normandy.

Infantry, Air Force, Medical, and Signal Corps Units in Tamerville and Valognes


Another post in an ongoing series about our trip to France for the 70th anniversary of D-Day and the Liberation of France and the memorial in Tamerville

My late father Felix A. Cizewski, served in Company C,  3110th Signal Service Battalion in Tamerville and Cherbourg during the liberation of Normandy in 1944.


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“Château de Chiffrevast”: 1944 and 2014

June 20, 2014

Two Signal Corps women1944:

Signal Corps women Pfc Laura Kepfli of Prague, Oklahoma and Pvt Helen Braun of St Louis, Missouri, unit unidentified. serving at a Signal Corps facility.

PhotosNormandie identifies this as outside of the orangery on the grounds of Château de Chiffrevast.

(An orangery or orangerie was a building in the grounds of fashionable residences from the 17th to the 19th centuries and given a classicising architectural form. The orangery was similar to a greenhouse or conservatory. The name reflects the original use of the building as a place where citrus trees were often wintered in tubs under cover, surviving through harsh frosts. -Wikipedia)

Photo:  Some rights reserved

Orangery2014:

An exact match between the 1944 and 2014 photos have not been found.

This is the closest to an orangery at the Chateau de Chiffrevast.

Photo by Cheryl A. Robinson

Northern France with details of the 3110th Signal Service Battalion’s service in Normandy.

Infantry, Air Force, Medical, and Signal Corps Units in Tamerville and Valognes


Another in an ongoing series about our trip to France for the 70th anniversary of D-Day and the Liberation of France and the memorial in Tamerville. Tamerville is among the places where my late father Felix A. Cizewski, served in Company C, 3110th Signal Service Battalion.


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