Archive for the ‘Unofficial Informal Archive of the U.S. Army Signal Corps in Northwest Europe in WWII’ Category

Another Face of a Tamerville Liberator

July 20, 2014

Wilbert Hans Hansen with Technician Fifth Grade insignia.
Undated photo © Chris Hansen

Wilbert Hansen’s son Chris Hansen found the information I have been posting about the 3110th Signal Service Battalion and the Tamerville recognition.

Chris’s late father Wilbert Hans Hansen served as a cable splicer in Company C, 3110th Signal Service Battalion as did Felix A. Cizewski my late father.

Our fathers probably knew each other.

Chris reports that except for the photo above almost everything else regarding his late father’s service has been lost.


The town of Tamerville and my Unofficial Informal Archive of the U.S. Army Signal Corps in Northwest Europe in WWII have greatly increased the visibility of the 3110th Signal Service Battalion. That facilitates making connections as the Hansen and Cizewski families have done. That also brings recognition to the service of support troops such as our fathers


For more information:

Northern France with details of the 3110th Signal Service Battalion’s service in Normandy.

Infantry, Air Force, Medical, and Signal Corps Units in Tamerville and Valognes


Revised October 12, 2014


Shortlink: http://wp.me/p2ix3W-uB

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Special 1942 Signal Corps issue of Radio News now available online

January 30, 2014
1942 Special Signal Corps Issue of Radio News

Cover of November, 1942 special Signal Corps issue of Radio News

American Radio History has uploaded the November, 1942, Special U.S. Army Signal Corps Issue (265 page in Adobe PDF format.)

That joins the February, 1944, Special U.S. Army Signal Corps Issue,


WWII Signal Corps veteran John Moriarty’s daughter Pat Nagel loaned original copies to the Unofficial Informal Archive of the U.S. Army Signal Corps in Northwest Europe in WWII to make the stories and photos available to families of  WWII Signal Corps veterans.

That is now possible thanks to the work of American Radio History.


The Unofficial Informal Archive of the U.S. Army Signal Corps in Northwest Europe in WWII donated the originals to the Virginia Holocaust Museum.


For more information:

Radio News

American Radio History

Unofficial Informal Archive of the U.S. Army Signal Corps in Northwest Europe in WWII.

Virginia Holocaust Museum

Adobe PDF Reader


Shortlink: http://wp.me/p2ix3W-md

215th Signal Depot Company addition a model for the Unofficial WWII Signal Corps Archive

January 3, 2014
Staff Sergeant William H. Johnson  Photo ©  Kathleen A. Johnson

Staff Sergeant William H. Johnson Photo © Kathleen A. Johnson

The recently added section on the 215th Signal Depot Company is one of the most complete as it includes:

  • The late William H. Johnson’s story as told to his daughter Kathleen.
  • Photos
  • Additional recollections from Dolores Johnson, his wife and Kathleen’s mother.
  • Kathleen Johnson’s compilation of a unit roster.
  • Kathleen Johnson’s completion of the story with a summary of her father’s postwar life.

215th Signal Depot Company section is the model for unit pages on Unofficial Informal Archive of the U.S. Army Signal Corps in Northwest Europe in WWII.


For more information:

215th Signal Depot Company

Signal Units in the Normandy Campaign

Unofficial Informal Archive of the U.S. Army Signal Corps in Northwest Europe in WWII


Shortlink: http://wp.me/p2ix3W-lx

Virginia Holocaust Museum accepts donation of Signal Corps artifacts

December 3, 2013

The Virginia Holocaust Museum has accepted the donation of three Signal Corps artifacts by way of my Unofficial Informal Archive of the U.S. Army Signal Corps in Northwest Europe in WWII.

Two are the late Camp Crowder trainee John Moriarty’s copies of two special editions of Radio News:

Radio News

Covers of November, 1942 and February 1944 special Signal Corps issues of Radio News

John Moriarty’s daughter Pat Nagel  loaned them to Unofficial Informal Archive of the U.S. Army Signal Corps in Northwest Europe in WWII.

I used them to create a Radio News page on the Unofficial Informal Archive of the U.S. Army Signal Corps in Northwest Europe in WWII.


The third artifact is a copy of A Rookie In Crowder

A Rookie in Crowder

A Rookie in Crowder is the Camp Crowder, Missouri edition of a souvenir comic book depicting basic training. Ned Eller is a cartoonist who trained as a front line combat infantryman.
The Ray C. Berry Syndicate copyrighted it in 1942. No information is available regarding the renewal of this copyright so it may now be in the public domain.

This  copy of “A Rookie at Crowder” was rescued from a garage sale by Chris McCluer of Mission, Kansas. He recognized that veterans and their families would appreciate its depiction of World War II Army basic training and donated it to the Unofficial Informal Archive of the U.S. Army Signal Corps in Northwest Europe in WWII site.

I scanned and uploaded it to Scribd and Google Documents.


Thanks to the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center for referring the Unofficial Informal Archive of the U.S. Army Signal Corps in Northwest Europe in WWII to the Virginia Holocaust Museum


Unofficial Informal Archive of the U.S. Army Signal Corps in Northwest Europe in WWII

As I researched the gaps in my late father’s Signal Corps service I realized I had compiled information that was not readily available elsewhere and would be useful to other family history researchers.

I shared my research on my family history site.

Veterans and their families contacted me with additions, corrections, stories, and photos to share.

Out of that evolved the Unofficial Informal Archive of the U.S. Army Signal Corps in Northwest Europe in WWII.

Recently people have sent artifacts. After sharing a copy on my site, all original artifacts are donated to an archives, museum, historical society, or library so the items are available to all.


For more information:

Radio News page on the Unofficial Informal Archive of the U.S. Army Signal Corps in Northwest Europe in WWII

Signal Corps training at Camp Crowder, Missouri page on the Unofficial Informal Archive of the U.S. Army Signal Corps in Northwest Europe in WWII

Virginia Holocaust Museum


Shortlink: http://wp.me/p2ix3W-kW

Radio News: special 1942 and 1944 Signal Corps issues

June 12, 2013
Radio News

Covers of November, 1942 and February 1944 special Signal Corps issues of Radio News

Pat Nagel, the daughter of the late Camp Crowder trainee John Moriarty shared with me the two special editions of Radio News that her father had saved.

American Radio History site is in the process uploading all issues of Radio News.

February, 1944, Special 1944 U.S. Army Signal Corps Issue has been uploaded. (The link is to the full 437 page Adobe PDF file).

The November, 1942 Special U.S. Army Signal Corps Issue will be available soon.

The originals of both issues along with other Signal Corps related artifacts will be donated to an archive, museum, library, or historical society. An announcement of which institution accepts the donation will be posted on this blog.


The February, 1944 issue contained the following photo of what may be the 45th Signal Company constructing communications wire in Sicily

Signal Corps men of the 45th

“Signal Corps men of the 45th Division” (possible the 45th Signal Company) setting up wire in Caltanissetta, Sicily. Undated.

This was about 17 months before Felix A. Cizewski was transferred to the 45th Signal Company in France in January, 1945.

While my late father is not in this photo, in my nine years of research this is the first photo I have found that illustrates in detail the type of work my late father did in France and Germany while serving in the 45th Signal Company in 1945


Among the reason Ms. Nagel shared these magazines is her hope that families of  WWII Signal Corps veterans would find insight into their relative’s service or photos of their relatives. 

I turn out to be one of those relatives who so far has found this photo and articles in the November, 1942 issue on the Signal Corps’ Camp Crowder, Missouri where my late father trained for about 19 months.

A Radio News page has been added to my Unofficial Informal Archive of the U.S. Army Signal Corps in Northwest Europe in WWII to make this great resource available to other WWII family history researchers.


For more information:

Radio News

Signal Corps training at Camp Crowder, Missouri.

45th Infantry Division

Unofficial Informal Archive of the U.S. Army Signal Corps in Northwest Europe in WWII


Shortlink: http://wp.me/p2ix3W-hR

3185th Signal Service Battalion veteran Senator Frank Lautenberg dies

June 6, 2013
Frank Lautenberg

Frank Lautenberg in undated photo during his WWII service.
Source: (AP Photo/Photo provided by Sen. Frank Lautenberg)

The late Senator Frank Lautenberg enlisted in early 1942 after the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor. He began his service in 1943 after he turned 19, finished high school, and his father passed away.

He was assigned to the U.S. Army Signal Corps and did basic training Signal Corps training center at Camp Crowder, Neosho, Missouri.

After basic training he was sent to the Signal Corps base at Fort Monmouth, New Jersey where he hoped to be admitted to Officer Candidates School.

Instead he was assigned to Company C, 3185th Signal Service Battalion. Company C was the battalion’s Open Wire Repair Section with pole and wire responsibilities including construction and maintenance. He had the enlisted rank of Technician Fifth Grade

On September 7, 1944, the 3185th left Boston aboard the Navy transport U.S.S. West Point (AP23). The Nazi U-boats had been defeated so the ship sailed alone rather than in  convoy. They arrived at  Liverpool, England on September 14, 1944.

From Liverpool, the battalion went to Southampton, England where they boarded ships to France. From the ship the battalion was transferred to small craft and disembarked on one of the Normandy beaches. From France they were sent to Antwerp, Belgium where they served for the rest of the war.

Antwerp was liberated on September 4, 1944.  Access to its harbor and port were secured by November 26 and became a major supply facility for the Allies. Army Service Forces were responsible for operating the port and distributing the supplies. Sen. Lautenberg and the 3185th may have been one of the Army Service Forces’ Signal Corps units that provided communications infrastructure and support.

Sen. Lautenberg reports that in an attempt to disrupt this supply line, the Nazis bombarded Antwerp almost continuously with V-weapons and jet bombers. Over 1200 V-1 and V-2 weapons hit Antwerp between October, 1944 and March, 1945.  They were militarily ineffective as they rarely if ever hit the military targets of the harbor, port, and supplies. Instead they mostly hit the civilians of Antwerp.

Civilian casualties in Antwerp from a 1944 Nazi V-weapon attack on Antwerp while Sen. Lautenberg was serving nearby.

While up on a communications pole Sen. Lautenberg was knocked to the ground  by the shock wave from the nearby explosion of a V-weapon. He suffered only minor bruises and resumed work the next day.

The Nazi attack on December 16, 1944, the Battle of the Bulge, had among its objectives the capture of Antwerp. Sen. Lautenberg and his unit were sent to the Antwerp train station and issued ammunition. The Americans stopped the Nazis before Sen. Lautenberg was deployed to the front.

After the defeat of the Nazis, the 3185th collected and secured valuable Army communications equipment. They were then sent to camps near Reims to be redeployed to the Pacific and the war with Japan. While there they learned of the dropping of the atomic bombs and the Soviets declaration of war and attack on the Japanese followed by the surrender of Japan.


Bitburg 1985

In 1985 while President Reagan was visiting the German military cemetery at Bitburg which included some graves of Nazi SS war criminals, Senator Lautenberg visited the graves of American WWII soldiers at Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial in Belgium.


Senator Lautenberg and my father, Felix A. Cizewski

If it was not for Senator Frank Lautenberg’s service in the  non-divisional 3185th Signal Service Battalion, this unit would be almost unknown and lost to history.

His passing is an opportunity to remember the service of such units. That also honors Sen. Lautenberg’s memory as it continues his work. Along with his life long commitment to ensure veterans received benefits such as health, housing, and education, he also prioritized their recognition and remembrance.

The popular culture image of WWII is of troops on the front lines and combat aircrews.

Behind every ground combat soldier were at least 10 men and women providing support. Behind ever combat air crew were least 12 men and women providing support. Those were millions of men and women in thousands of units such as Sen. Lautenberg’s 3185th and Felix A. Cizewski’s 3110th Signal Service Battalion.

If my late father wrote letters home, none survived. He talked very little of his service. After his death in 2004, I researched his history. Frank Lautenberg’s description of his service is the closest I have ever found to my late father’s. When I listen to the interview with Senator Lautenberg, I am able to imagine he was also telling my late father’s story.

Both my late father and Senator Lauterberg trained at the same time at Camp Crowder, Missouri in 1943. Both were assigned to Signal Service Battalions and to their battalion’s Company C, the Open Wire Repair Section. My late father’s battalion was in the Army Service Forces. Sen. Lautenberg’s description of his service strongly suggests that his battalion was also.

Both passed through Fort Monmouth, New Jersey on their way to Britain from where they were deployed to France.

Both my late father and Sen. Lautenberg provided communications support for the Army Service Forces, my late father on the Cotenin Peninsula and in Paris, Sen. Lautenberg’s in Antwerp.

Both suffered non-battle injuries during their service. My late father suffered frostbite to his hands and feet. Sen. Lautenberg was knocked off a communications pole from the shock wave from the nearby explosion of a Nazi weapon.

After the end of the war in Europe, both were sent to camps near Reims for redeployment to the Pacific and the war with Japan. They both learned of the surrender of Japan and returned to the U.S. from there.


June 6: 69th anniversary of the 1944  D-Day landings in Normandy

On June 6, 1944, Senator Lautenberg in Company C of the 3185th Signal Service Battalion was in the U.S. preparing to be deployed to Europe.

My later father, Felix A. Cizewski, in Company C of the 3110th Signal Service Battalion was in southern England constructing the communications infrastructure to support and supply the troops landing on Normandy. The 3110th was awarded the Meritorious Unit Commendation for this work.


WWII veterans in the Senate

Senator Lautenberg was the last WWII veteran to serve in the U.S. Senate. This is the first time in 70 years that the Senate has been without a WWII veteran.


For more information:

Interview format may only play with the free version of RealPlayer software.

Entry for Senator Lautenberg on page 27.

Includes photo of  Sen. Lautenberg at Arc De Triumph in Paris.

Contains at least one error and one omission:

His Europe Africa Middle East Medal is erroneously listed as “European African Medal; Eastern Service Medal”.

Senator Lautenberg description of his service indicates that he earned participation credit for service in the Rhineland Campaign. That medal is not listed.


Revised October 26, 2013
Short link: http://wp.me/p2ix3W-he

Plans approved for memorial to U.S. troops in Tamerville, France

May 29, 2013
Château de Chiffrevast

Château de Chiffrevast near Tamerville & Valognes, Normandy.
The Château de Chiffrevast was used as a communications
facility by the Germans. After liberation in 1944 the Americans resumed
using it for communications.
Aerial photo © Georges Dennebouy taken May 26, 2013.

Georges Dennebouy, Remi Agnes, Claude Letellier, and Mickael Simon  search the Cotenin Peninsula for American aircraft downed during the 1944 Normandy Campaign.

They have also been working with the mayor and town council of Tamerville in Manche, Normandy, France to commemorate the Americans who served in and around Tamerville during WWII.

They reported that the mayor and town council of Tamerville have just decided to build a memorial in honor of the U.S. soldiers who served in and around Tamerville and the U.S. airmen who came down near Tamerville.

The memorial is planned for completion in time for the 70th anniversary of D-Day in June, 2014.

Units that served in and around Tamerville include Army air force crews, paratroopers, infantry, medical, and Signal Corps units.

Among the Signal Corps units were Company C, 3110th Signal Service Battalion in which my late father, Felix A. Cizewski, was serving.

Research continues to identify U.S. Army units that served in and around Tamerville. Anyone with additional information are urged to share it with Leonard H. Cizewski.


For more information:

Infantry, Air Force, Medical, and Signal Corps Units in Tamerville and Valognes

Photos of Signal Corps women, men, and facilities in Cherbourg, Tamerville, & Valognes

Unofficial Informal Archive of the U.S. Army Signal Corps in Northwest Europe in WWII

Felix A. Cizewski & Company C, 3110th Signal Service Battalion in the Northern France Campaign


Shortlink: http://wp.me/p2ix3W-gc

38th Signal Construction Battalion in Noorbeeck, Holland: Seven photos added to Unofficial WWII Signal Corps Archives

January 29, 2013
GI & little girl in Holland

Winter, 1944- 1945. Noorbeek, the Netherlands: Unidentified member of the 38th Signal Battalion with three year old Dutch girl. In the background are the village church and the battalion’s vehicles including a truck with a crane which would have been used in the battalion’s construction work.

Seven photos have been added to the pages on the 38th Signal Construction Battalion on my Unofficial Informal Archive of the U.S. Army Signal Corps in Northwest Europe in WWII

Four photos are from December, 1944 to March, 1945 when the battalion was stationed in Noorbeek, the Netherlands, including the one above. The smile on the little Dutch girl is among the best illustrations of the joy of all we liberated from the Nazis.

Three photos are from the September, 2004 inauguration of two plaques to commemorate the 38th’s service in Noorbeek. Those plaques symbolized the unbreakable bonds of enduring friendship between America and those we liberated.


Revised June 25, 2013
Shortlink: http://wp.me/p2ix3W-fk

A Rookie in Crowder: New addition to the WWII Signal Corps section

August 12, 2011
A Rookie in Crowder

A Rookie in Crowder is the Camp Crowder, Missouri edition of a souvenir comic book depicting basic training. Ned Eller is a cartoonist who trained as a front line combat infantryman.
The Ray C. Berry Syndicate copyrighted it in 1942. No information is available regarding the renewal of this copyright so it may now be in the public domain.

A Rookie in Crowder is the Camp Crowder, Missouri edition of a souvenir comic book depicting basic training. Ned Eller is  a cartoonist who trained as a front line combat infantryman.

Felix A. Cizewski, my late father, trained at Camp Crowder beginning in May, 1942.

Recruits spent three weeks learning the basics of soldiering: drill; equipment, clothing, and tent pitching; first aid; defense against chemical attack; articles of war; basic signal communication; interior guard duty; military discipline; and rifle marksmanship.

– Rebecca Robbins Rainsy

Getting the Message Through, A Branch History of the U.S. Army Signal Corps, Chapter VII, World War II: Establishing the Circuits of Victory

Camp Crowder training did not include bayonets,  machine guns, and mortars as  depicted in the comic strip but included many of the other aspects of camp life.

This is a scan of a copy of “A Rookie at Crowder” rescued from a garage sale by Chris McCluer of Mission, Kansas. He recognized that veterans and their families would appreciate its depiction of World War II Army basic training and donated it to the Unofficial Informal Archive of the U.S. Army Signal Corps in Northwest Europe in WWII site.


View on Scribd:

A Rookie in Crowder


Shortlink: http://wp.me/p2ix3W-2P
Updated: December 2, 2013

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